Thanks for sharing your story with me

A great insight into trauma and recovery.  I think it would provide a lot of hope to others as well as be a good guide (or some might say bible!) to those who may be close to someone who has experienced childhood trauma. It reminded me so strongly of the honesty that Anne Deveson brought to
her book about her son (Tell me I am here) that really touched me as a young adult. Therefore I got inspired! Now I am reading Anne’s book again almost 15
years later.

 

You have a gift for writing and I just wanted to say thanks for sharing your story with me.

 

 

Sage Telford

 

Prioritise support for the abused: ASCA

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/8408133/prioritise-support-for-the-abused-asca

Governments need to do more to support the two million Australian adults who have experienced child abuse, survivors say.

Adults Surviving Child Abuse (ASCA) says all governments should do more to help health services identify and respond to trauma, in particular the complex trauma of child abuse.

Cathy Kezelman, ASCA’s head of stakeholder relations, said health services needed the right tools to provide proper care for adults who too often suffered in silence from the trauma of their childhood abuse.

“There is a significant research base that shows the damaging effects of the often multiple, unresolved trauma of childhood experiences on the brain,” Dr
Kezelman said in a statement.

“But research also shows us that the brain has the capacity to repair itself. With the right support, adults abused as children can reclaim control of their lives
and make an important contribution to society.”

She said the annual estimated cost of child abuse and neglect among Australians had been estimated at $4 billion. She said more than two million Australian adults had experienced some form of child abuse.

Guidelines need to be developed to fill a gap in education and awareness among health professionals to help them identify and deal with the impact of childhood trauma resulting from abuse, ASCA said in the statement.

Don’t ignore abuse victims on national day

http://www.businessspectator.com.au/bs.nsf/Article/Dont-ignore-abuse-victims-on-national-day-QTAC5?OpenDocument&src=hp8

Don’t ignore abuse victims on national day

Jan 24th,
2012

Business Spectator

Community
leaders should spare a moment on Australia Day to think about helping child abuse survivors get a new start, an advocacy group says.

Two million Australian adults who have experienced child abuse need more support to live healthy lives, Adults Surviving Child Abuse (ASCA) says.

“As the country comes together to honour and reflect on its annual achievements, ASCA is calling on governments and policy makers to prioritise support for the more than two million adult Australians who have experienced child abuse in all its forms,” the group said.

“Just like our new citizens, many of these Australians are working towards living healthy and happy lives. The good news is, a better life is possible,” Dr
Cathy Kezelman of ASCA said.

“But change needs to be led by the leaders of our community.

She said health services needed the right tools to provide proper care for adults who often suffered in silence from the trauma of childhood abuse.

With the right support, they could regain control of their lives and make an important contribution to society, the doctor said.

She said more than two million Australian adults had experienced some form of child abuse, and the annual cost to the country of child abuse and neglect had been estimated at $4 billion.

Professor Donna Cross, Western Australia’s nominee for Australian of the Year, has said problems children face in early life such as abuse and bullying can lead to alcohol and drug abuse and violence in adulthood.

I want to thank you for publishing your experience -your absolute courage in putting it out there.

I have wanted to write to you since reading your book “Innocence Revisited” in November. I want to thank you for publishing your experience -your absolute courage in putting it out there.

Your account resonates with me on many levels. Above all, I value your descriptions of the processes of remembering and discovering yourself – that long,
fraught, strange, hazardous path. And the utter importance of a skilled and sensitive therapist with you on that journey.

My history bears similarities to yours -the details don’t matter- but reading your book helped me feel sane and hopeful. It is deeply reassuring to see that a
similar person has gone through such trauma and managed to persist and battle to discover herself. Your story helps me understand some of the how and what of survival and healing because it is a complete narrative. The sheer hard messy slog is something that isn’t conveyed in the tidy personal snippets in
(excellent) books like “The Courage to Heal” by Bass and Davis.

So I am deeply grateful for your commitment to yourself and to others in sharing your incredible achievement, and your public advocacy work in
ASCA.

You have opened up my world and again, I thank you.